Sophie Calle

Artist lecture Tuesday, May 31, 2011 7PM
Timken Lecture Hall, California College of the Arts, San Francisco

French conceptual artist and writer Sophie Calle has redefined through personal investigation the terms and parameters of subject/object, the public versus the private, and role-playing. In her conceptual projects, Calle immerses herself in examinations of voyeurism, intimacy, and identity through image, object, and text. She often creates performance-like projects where she plays detective and voyeur, involving herself in bizarre situations with strangers and recording them. Her piece Take Care of Yourself, which was shown at the Venice Biennale, was named after the last line of her ex’s breakup email. For this piece Calle asked over 100 women to interpret the email and posted the results in the French Pavilion.

Calle’s work continues to resonate with viewers because it is highly personal, brutally honest, and inventive. Her work is presented in major galleries and museums around the world.

 

 


Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program

Pier 24 Photography is pleased to present the Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program in collaboration with California College of the Arts and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Each year, the Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program brings six photographers, writers, and curators to San Francisco to offer free and open lectures, and to work one-on-one with students at California College of the Arts.


Larry Sultan Photography Award


Awoiska van der Molen, #256-17, 2009

Awoiska van der Molen

Fall 2017 Residency
Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, CA

Click HERE for more information on the Larry Sultan Photography Award

The work of Awoiska van der Molen (b. 1972, Netherlands) develops from a desire to comprehend the core of the isolated world she photographs. In order to achieve the sense of solitude necessary to gain access to the stoic nature of the landscape, she spends long periods of time isolated in the natural environment. She takes time to experience the landscape and penetrates deep into the essence of the remote, hushed world created in her photographs. She immerses herself in the landscape, moves slowly, returns repeatedly and by doing so makes these unknown places her own. This gradual and solitary working process continues into the darkroom where her pictures are printed by hand—an intimate process—further imparting a unique stillness that emanates from her work.