Zoe Strauss

Artist lecture Tuesday, October 23, 2012 7PM
Timken Lecture Hall, California College of the Arts, San Francisco
Vanessa, Philadelphia, 2006

Self-taught photographer Zoe Strauss was born in 1970 in Philadelphia. She aspires “to create an epic narrative that reflects the beauty and struggle of everyday life,” which she historically examines within the context of her hometown. On her 30th birthday, she was given a camera and started taking pictures of life in Philadelphia’s marginal neighborhoods. She has since been described as the “chronicler of Philadelphia’s mean streets” and the city’s own Diane Arbus.

Between 2001 and 2011, she exhibited her photographs in a yearly exhibition titled Under I-95, which featured her prints affixed to columns under an elevated section of Highway I-95.

Strauss received a Seedling Award in photography from the Leeway Foundation in 2002, a Pew Fellowship in 2005, and in 2006, her work was included in the Whitney Biennial. In 2007, Strauss was named a 2007 USA Gund Fellow. This year the Philadelphia Museum of Art organized 10 Years, Strauss’s mid-career retrospective.


Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program

Pier 24 Photography is pleased to present the Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program in collaboration with California College of the Arts and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Each year, the Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program brings six photographers, writers, and curators to San Francisco to offer free and open lectures, and to work one-on-one with students at California College of the Arts.


Larry Sultan Photography Award


Awoiska van der Molen, #256-17, 2009

Awoiska van der Molen

Fall 2017 Residency
Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, CA

Click HERE for more information on the Larry Sultan Photography Award

The work of Awoiska van der Molen (b. 1972, Netherlands) develops from a desire to comprehend the core of the isolated world she photographs. In order to achieve the sense of solitude necessary to gain access to the stoic nature of the landscape, she spends long periods of time isolated in the natural environment. She takes time to experience the landscape and penetrates deep into the essence of the remote, hushed world created in her photographs. She immerses herself in the landscape, moves slowly, returns repeatedly and by doing so makes these unknown places her own. This gradual and solitary working process continues into the darkroom where her pictures are printed by hand—an intimate process—further imparting a unique stillness that emanates from her work.