Jason Fulford

Artist lecture Sunday, March 04, 2012 7PM
Timken Lecture Hall, California College of the Arts, San Francisco
San Francisco, 2013

“Sometimes if you see something so completely unremarkable, it’s heartbreaking. I don’t know why. Sometimes if you see something so totally ridiculous and straightforward, it’s also heartbreaking. It gives you this weird feeling where your eyes swell up and you can’t decide whether to laugh or cry.” – Jason Fulford, 2005

Jason Fulford has been depicting “the simultaneous feeling of sad and funny” throughout his career. Born in Atlanta, GA, and now living in San Francisco, CA, Fulford has a BA from Pratt Institute in New York. His work has been exhibited in New York, Seattle, Copenhagen, Budapest, Atlanta and Kansas City, and has been published in The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, Life, Newsweek, Suddeutche Zeitung, among many more.

His photographs have also graced the covers of books published by virtually every major publishing house – which is entirely fitting, as Fulford is co-founder of a book imprint himself (J&L Books, Inc., established 2001). A graphic designer and freelance commercial photographer as well as an artist, Fulford is the author of four books: The Mushroom Collector (2010), Raising Frogs for $ $ $ (2006), Crushed (2003), and Sunbird (2000).

 


Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program

Pier 24 Photography is pleased to present the Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program in collaboration with California College of the Arts and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Each year, the Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program brings six photographers, writers, and curators to San Francisco to offer free and open lectures, and to work one-on-one with students at California College of the Arts.


Larry Sultan Photography Award


Awoiska van der Molen, #256-17, 2009

Awoiska van der Molen

Fall 2017 Residency
Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, CA

Click HERE for more information on the Larry Sultan Photography Award

The work of Awoiska van der Molen (b. 1972, Netherlands) develops from a desire to comprehend the core of the isolated world she photographs. In order to achieve the sense of solitude necessary to gain access to the stoic nature of the landscape, she spends long periods of time isolated in the natural environment. She takes time to experience the landscape and penetrates deep into the essence of the remote, hushed world created in her photographs. She immerses herself in the landscape, moves slowly, returns repeatedly and by doing so makes these unknown places her own. This gradual and solitary working process continues into the darkroom where her pictures are printed by hand—an intimate process—further imparting a unique stillness that emanates from her work.